“What’s That?” Wednesday: Hoarfrost

hoar frost text

There is something magical about hoarfrost. Yes, it is just frost.  But the way that it resembles ferns, feathers, leaves, or any number of other natural objects, makes it seem otherworldly. It is impossible not to be instantly drawn to its fantastically delicate branches, which instantaneously crumble at the touch of curious little fingers, making them seem almost as if they vanish by magic.

Read on to find out a bit more about hoarfrost as well as to download printable sheets of useful photos and information about them. Each Wednesday, check the bottom of the “What’s That?” post to find a PDF containing a fact sheet about the day’s featured item, as well as photographs and other resources ideal for using in a nature journal, interactive notebook, or lap book.

Hoar Frost 30-1 Hoar frost 31-1Frost feather 20-1 Hoar forst 33-1

Some things to know about hoarfrost:

– Hoarfrost is a feathery, leafy type of frost that forms on objects exposed to open air.

– Like other types of frost, hoarfrost is made up of ice crystals.

– It is formed when the frost point in the air is reached and water vapor condenses into ice.

– Cold temps are not enough to form hoarfrost; the air must also be sufficiently saturated with water vapor.

– Hoarfrost often occurs in areas when there is open water, which provides ample water vapor for the frost to form.

Resources

SnowCrystals.com has a great Guide to Frost (including a way to grow your own hoarfrost!)

 

Click here to download the hoarfrost nature journal resource pages to use with your own family.

 

Have you seen any hoarfrost this winter?

We would love to see your photos! You can tag them with #mudtometeors on Instagram or share on the Mud Puddles to Meteors Facebook group.

 

 

2 comments… add one

  • Tamara March 18, 2015, 4:01 pm

    You take the best shots of frost – I am just loving that last one soooo much. Thanks for introducing me to hoarfrost. It’s pretty cool! ;)

    • dawn March 21, 2015, 6:30 am

      Thanks, Tam! Happy to share!

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