Nature In Your Neighborhood is a feature that focuses on the nature that we all interact with in our everyday lives. Through the window of these posts you can catch glimpses of nature in action in locations across the country (and sometimes beyond).

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I am sharing a bit of nature around our Nova Scotia neighborhood today. We are finally getting some warmer temps but a sweater (and even a hat and scarf) was necessary when out for an early morning walk.

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hobblebush (Viburnum lantanoides)

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young birch

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first blueberry flower

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crab spider

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spruce buds

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small white violet

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green frog

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dew on web of unknown spider

Wild azalea  -1wild azalea

If you would like to share what is happening in your neighborhood you can leave a link to a post in the comments here or pop on over to the Mud Puddles to Meteors Facebook group and share a little bit of your world.

Not a member of the FB group yet? No worries. Just request to join and we will add you ASAP!

~ Dawn

A Note About Contributing to Nature In Your Neighborhood:

If you would like to contribute please shoot us an email with your photo(s) and a few sentences about your experience at: kidsandnature (at) gmail (dot) com. (Please also include your location – your state or country is fine).

We would also love to highlight photos and descriptions from young naturalist out there. If your child would like to contribute a photo of what they found, and tell us a little about it, please encourage them to do so and we will spotlight them in a “Young Naturalist” post. (Don’t worry so much about photo quality. We would love to share their work!)

We are looking forward to sharing your nature finds and continuing to encourage families to look high and low for nature all around.

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Nature Around the Net

May 23, 2015

Bluet 8-1

This week was another week of great nature around the net!

- People Who Appreciate Nature Are Happier

- Notable Summer Reads for Outdoor Families

- The Mayfly’s Lifecycle: a fascinating, fleeting story

- 10 Easy Ways to Keep Kids Outside This Summer

Have you come across a neat nature related post or article this week?

Feel free to share in the comments or on our Mud Puddles to Meteors Facebook Group page. We would love to see what you have found!

Have a wonderful weekend!

~ Dawn

P.S. There is just one more week to sign up for my online workshop “Everyday Nature for Families!” I would love to have you join us!

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Pond skater text

Pond skaters go by many names; they are known as water spiders, magic bugs, water skimmers, water scooters, and a favorite name around here, water striders. Whatever they are called by, they seem to do the impossible: walk on water. They have mastered the use of surface tension to move around, rather quickly, on the surface of quiet waterways such as ponds, lakes, and slow moving sections of creeks. With their amazing ability to stride across the surface of the water, they are easy to spot and identify for even the youngest explorer.

Read on to find out a bit more about pond skaters as well as to download printable sheets of useful photos and information about them. Each Wednesday, check the bottom of the “What’s That?” post to find a PDF containing a fact sheet about the day’s featured item, as well as photographs and other resources ideal for using in a nature journal, interactive notebook, or lap book.

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Some Things to Know About Pond Skaters:

- Pond skaters are insects that live all throughout the Northern Hemisphere.

- There have been over 1,700 species identified by scientists. 90% of them live in freshwater.

- They are easily identified because of their ability to use surface tension to “walk on water.”

- Pond skaters use vibrations on the surface of the water to communicate and find prey, such as insects that have fallen into the water.

- They sense the vibrations and ripples on the surface with hairs on their body and legs.

- As predators, they eat insects that land on the surface of the water as well as the larvae of other insects.

- They have three sets of legs and the front set has claws in the middle, similar to those of the praying mantis.

- Their main threats are birds, frogs, toads, fish and newts.

- Pond skaters are very agile and move quickly to evade predators or catch prey.

- They can fly.

- Pond skaters mate on the surface of the water.

- The female lays her eggs on rocks and plants under the water or near the edge of the water.

- Nymphs go through 5 instars, and molt every 7-10 days before becoming an adult.

- They leave the water to find a spot to hibernate before winter and reemerge in the spring.

 

Clickhere to download the pond skater nature journal resource pages to use with your own family.

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Nature In Your Neighborhood is a feature that focuses on the nature that we all interact with in our everyday lives. Through the window of these posts you can catch glimpses of nature in action in locations across the country (and sometimes beyond).

……..

Here is a little of what has been popping up, and slithering along, in our Nova Scotia backyard this week!

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blueberry buds

green snake-1

green snake

Horsetails 1-1

horsetails

mayflowers pink 1-1

mayflowers

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pussy willow

red elderberry 1-1

red elderberry

If you would like to share what is happening in your neighborhood you can leave a link to a post in the comments here or pop on over to the Mud Puddles to Meteors Facebook group and share a little bit of your world.

Not a member of the FB group yet? No worries. Just request to join and we will add you ASAP!

 

A Note About Contributing to Nature In Your Neighborhood:

If you would like to contribute please shoot us an email with your photo(s) and a few sentences about your experience at: kidsandnature (at) gmail (dot) com. (Please also include your location – your state or country is fine).

We would also love to highlight photos and descriptions from young naturalist out there. If your child would like to contribute a photo of what they found, and tell us a little about it, please encourage them to do so and we will spotlight them in a “Young Naturalist” post. (Don’t worry so much about photo quality. We would love to share their work!)

We are looking forward to sharing your nature finds and continuing to encourage families to look high and low for nature all around.

 

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Nature Around the Net

May 16, 2015

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As usual there were some great links that came up this week!

- Chloe is a nine year-0ld naturalist who has created a blog to share her wonderful photos. Simply beautiful!

- There is still time to be a Butterfly Hero.

- Your Brain, On Nature!

- Timelapse Flowers. Love the sequence that starts at 1:15!

- A Spring Gardening Giveaway over at Imagine Childhood.

- Creating a Bird Feeding Haven. Awesome invitation!

Have you come across a neat nature related post or article this week? Feel free to share in the comments or on our Mud Puddles to Meteors Facebook Group page. We would love to see what you have found!

I am off for a hike with my mama friends this morning.

Have a wonderful weekend!

~ Dawn

P.S. I created a free PDF – Nature Every Day: 3 Simple Ways to Connect with Nature in Your Daily Life. You can pop over here to download it!

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whatever the weather cover

Today in the “pinching ourselves because we aren’t sure it’s real” department: our book cover! Although our publication date is still many turns of the calendar page away, things continue to move forward on our book project behind the scenes. The page proofs were sent back to our editor this week, and we are both incredibly happy with how the book is coming together thus far. The folks at Roost have done a fantastic job with the design of the book, and both Dawn and I feel as though they have really captured the spirit of the book, as while as our aesthetic, with the cover.

After months of writing and photographing, turning our hard work over to the team at Roost was a sincere leap of faith. But to see it all become a real and actual book has been incredible fun, and we can’t wait until the day that we can share more than just the cover.

— Annie

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Nature In Your Neighborhood is a feature that focuses on the nature that we all interact with in our everyday lives. Through the window of these posts you can catch glimpses of nature in action in locations across the country (and sometimes beyond).

……..

Nova Scotia, Canada

We extended our neighborhood a bit yesterday to include a favorite spot down the road. Just weeks ago this spot was still had deep snow in some areas. We were happy to see the snow gone and a few signs of spring on the rocky coast.

Pollys cove coast-1Lichen Rocks-1Suculent Rock-1Fish bones-1Crab shell 1-1

If you would like to share what is happening in your neighborhood you can leave a link to a post in the comments here or pop on over to the Mud Puddles to Meteors Facebook group and share a little bit of your world.

Not a member of the FB group yet? No worries. Just request to join and we will add you ASAP!

A Note About Contributing to Nature In Your Neighborhood:

If you would like to contribute please either add a photo or two with a short description to the Flickr group, post it to the Facebook Group, or shoot us an email with your photo(s) and a few sentences about your experience at: kidsandnature (at) gmail (dot) com. (Please also include your location – your state or country is fine).

We would also love to highlight photos and descriptions from young naturalist out there. If your child would like to contribute a photo of what they found, and tell us a little about it, please encourage them to do so and we will spotlight them in a “Young Naturalist” post. (Don’t worry so much about photo quality. We would love to share their work!)

We are looking forward to sharing your nature finds and continuing to encourage families to look high and low for nature all around.

 

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Nature Around the Net

May 9, 2015

Riverwalk 1 goslings-1

Today is Global Big Day to support global conservation of bird habitat. Here is how to enter your sightings. You can check in here to see numbers from around the world!

 

Here are a few more links you might like to kick off the weekend!

- This is a great version of a DIY rain gauge.

- An amazing, immortal jellyfish!

- This is a fun wax resist pond inspired art project.

Happy Outdoor Exploring!

Dawn & Annie

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Hitting the Trail is a regular feature here at Mud Puddles to Meteors. In each post we will share trails, parks, beaches, and museums from around the country (and sometimes even beyond). If you would like to join in and share a special nature location please send us an email at kidsandnature@gmail.com with the details listed at the bottom of the post and links to the photos. We would love to share your nature adventure!

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Today we are welcoming, Susana, who is sharing her wonderful experience in a beautiful spot called Lochwinnoch, near Glasgow, Scotland.

lochwinnoch

lochwinnoch

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Lochwinnoch
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Things to Know

Location: Lochwinnoch, near Glasgow, Scotland

Habitat: wetlands

Favorite Plant and Animal Life: this is a RSPB nature reserve, specially good to spot all kinds of birds. I loved seeing the primroses and all the catkins in different tree but the children we more excited by the flowering wild strawberries

Special Features: I has a bird watching center, so even in wet weather is worth to visit, with a beautiful view of the loch, binoculars and very knowledge staff. There is also materials available for pond dipping and a natural playground.

Best Time of Year to Visit: We visit Lochwinnoch all year, it’s only 20 min on the train from Glasgow central station, but the best time it’s the warmer months, from Spring to Summer because there are so many birds and plantation to see.

 

Thanks so much for sharing, Susana!

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Nature In Your Neighborhood is a feature that focuses on the nature that we all interact with in our everyday lives. Through the window of these posts you can catch glimpses of nature in action in locations across the country (and sometimes beyond).

………..

Today we are welcoming Madison (age 11), a young naturalist from Florida!

DogwoodWoodpecker Damage

From Madison:

Woodpecker Damage

On Monday, April 27th, my mom, sister, and I were in the backyard working on our nature journals. We were working on a season color wheel when we heard something in our dogwood tree. There was a red-bellied woodpecker in my favorite tree! After it had left, I looked up and thought I saw some damage. I climbed up and took a picture to show my mom and sister. 

Thank you for sharing your experience, Madison!

We love your adventurous spirit and willingness to go to extra heights to investigate nature!

…….

If you would like to share what is happening in your neighborhood you can leave a link to a post in the comments here or pop on over to the Mud Puddles to Meteors Facebook group and share a little bit of your world.

Not a member of the FB group yet? No worries. Just request to join and we will add you ASAP!

~ Dawn

A Note About Contributing to Nature In Your Neighborhood:

If you would like to contribute please either add a photo or two with a short description to the Flickr group, post it to the Facebook Group, or shoot us an email with your photo(s) and a few sentences about your experience at: kidsandnature (at) gmail (dot) com. (Please also include your location – your state or country is fine).

We would also love to highlight photos and descriptions from young naturalist out there. If your child would like to contribute a photo of what they found, and tell us a little about it, please encourage them to do so and we will spotlight them in a “Young Naturalist” post. (Don’t worry so much about photo quality. We would love to share their work!)

We are looking forward to sharing your nature finds and continuing to encourage families to look high and low for nature all around.

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